);

“Since the first time I got drunk when I was 14, binge drinking at the weekend was always an expected pastime amongst my group of friends.

 

“My late teens and early twenties were a blur of boozy nights out and terrible hangovers. I never questioned that what I was doing wasn’t the norm. Everyone enjoys a night out don’t they?

 

“My friends all drank in a similar way. At least I thought they did. The reality is that the party extended into the week for me. I began to buy boxes of wine instead of bottles and it wasn’t uncommon for me to hit the vodka after a hard Tuesday or Wednesday or Thursday. I would often lie about how much I was drinking, knowing deep down that things had gotten out of control.

.A mum who used to down a litre of vodka with a friend ‘for fun’ has revealed how she managed to quit drink before it killed her.

Megan Montague’s alcoholism was so severe it meant getting drunk regularly and not even knowing how she got home.

For the mum-of-two heavy boozing was a normal part of her life.

The 31-year-old held down jobs and had a good social and family life, but she eventually realised, at the age of 30, she needed to quit.

She said: “I used to get obliterated all the time. Sharing a litre of vodka with a friend ‘for fun’.

  1. Mum-of-two and blogger at Sober Story, Megan Montague decided to make a change when she became stuck in a cycle of
    thinking that drinking was alleviating her stress. Now almost a year sober,
    Megan is documenting her journey to sobriety and happiness, in order to inspire
    others.
     The biggest motivation to stop drinking was seeing

    the impact it was having on those closest to me – in particular, my children. I
    had far less patience, I was constantly stressed and anxious and I was totally
    depleted.”

My life used to be ruled by numbers. As a young woman, I was so determined not to get any bigger than a size 8 that I used to restrict myself to 1,000 calories a day. I had an encyclopaedic knowledge of calorific values.

I also weighed myself constantly and my mood was very much linked to whatever digits flashed up on the scales.

It’s ironic, because today I weigh 2st more than I used to but I am exactly the same dress size, which I put down to healthy eating and working out with weights to build muscle.

My former self would have been totally shocked by such an increase but I feel liberated that I’m not ruled by those numbers any more.

I eat to fuel my body. and I don’t ever count the calories.

After having had two children I’m proud of how I look. But I’m not defined by it.

The third and final blogger I spoke to was Megan Montague, who shares the highs and lows of her sober journey over at Sober Story. After having suffered with anxiety and eating disorders as a young adult, Megan was able to find peace by taking control of her health, which for her meant hitting the gym and giving up alcohol.

“I had just reached a point in my life where alcohol was holding me back in every way and I was just TIRED of feeling terrible all the time. My mental health was at an all-time low and I felt like life was beginning to fall apart. There were just no upsides to drinking anymore.”

“When I was drinking, I couldn’t wait to get the kids to bed,” says Megan Montague, a freelance business consultant and single mother to children aged six and four. For, awaiting her in the fridge, would be a rather nice bottle of wine that, over the course of an evening, she would steadily drain, alone. “By mid-afternoon I would get the craving. Every day I’d say to myself, ‘No wine today,’ but every night I’d cave in, thinking, ‘Oh, it’s been a tough day.’ I was stuck in a cycle thinking that drinking was alleviating my stresses.”

Last March she reached a point where she thought, “I can’t live like this, always feeling hungover.” So she signed up to Sober Spring, a three-month alcohol-free sabbatical devised by Catherine Gray, author of The Unexpected Joy of Being Sober. “I joined an online group of 10 of us, which was helpful in terms of accountability,” she says.

 

How I went from drunk to sober: Single mother shares photos of her ‘chaotic’ life when she used to down a litre of vodka ‘for fun’ – and reveals how she quit partying for the sake of her children

Megan Montague, 31, from Kent, has overcome battle with alcohol addiction

Mother-of-two admits she used to get ‘obliterated’- especially in her twenties

She saw a 90-day challenge on Instagram and hasn’t looked back since

A mother-of-two who has overcome alcohol addiction has opened up about her struggles and recovery online in the hope that other people will be encouraged to quit.

 

What factors do you think are the most influential in staying sober?

 

I think all the small changes are the most influential with staying sober. You really have to look after yourself from all angles. Diet, sleep, exercise, fun, and relationships are all so vital to keep my mental health in check.

Megan has been alcohol-free for over a year with the primary goal of reducing her stress, anxiety, and wellbeing. She started her blog Sober Story to inspire others in the same boat, which discusses parenting, mental health and what’s worked for her.

When making positive changes in your life, do you usually choose the option that’s more familiar with less risk or one that could potentially make you unpopular among your support system?

 

Megan, thankfully, chose the latter without becoming unpopular with her friends and family but the choice of doing it anyway should that have been the case is what drew me to her.

 

Having a glass of wine or going out for “drinks” is something so widely popular that we don’t really think much about it yet it does affect not only our health but our relationships – especially when going about it too often.

 

Don’t get me wrong, I personally enjoy my glass of rosé or a brunch mimosa but Megan knew she had taken it a bit too far.

 

In this episode, you’ll hear:
• how she was considered a party girl and the one comment that made her think twice about her options
• the first improvements she noticed after giving up alcohol
• why she’s chosen to document her journey publicly
• what she chooses to do instead of pouring herself a glass of wine after a long day
• how fitness and her time at the gym keeps her momentum going

There was a time when being sober at this time of year would have felt like a punishment. But now I know I’m not missing out on the party by not drinking alcohol.

 

I am writing this approaching my first sober Christmas. There was a time when being sober at this time of year would have felt like a punishment. That so much of the fun and magic of Christmas wouldn’t be there without mulled wine, glass after glass of bubbles and many boozy nights out.

 

Today I know I am going to have a magical Christmas with my children, family and friends and I’ll remember each moment and have memories to last a lifetime. I don’t feel like I am missing out on the party by not joining in with drinking alcohol.

 

What I will be missing out on is hangovers, anxiety, exhaustion and stress.

 

Getting to the point I am at now hasn’t been easy. I decided to stop drinking in March 2018 after my stress and anxiety had reached an all-time high. I have suffered with anxiety for most of my life with it hitting its peak following a difficult marriage and subsequent divorce along with raising two young children largely on my own.

 

This week is a soberstory and we are joined on the pod by Megan – who is Soberstory on insta ! @soberstory and @mysoberstory on Facebook. Megan is a great positive sobersis who embraces selfcare with many daily practices, she is a working single mum to two gorgeous kids and credits her soberlife to a complete transformation in the parenting experience, feeling more patient, less stressed and more present since going sober over a year ago and loves her soberlife. Megan is also part of the #1000hoursdry worldwide movement from 1st June to June 11th, running UK based support and events with another brilliant sober badass babe Holly @sobersista Grab a cuppa and let’s chat